Mult-generational housing…Obama’s “New” America.

Humans adapt.  We get used to new realities and make the best of them.  Sheep would prefer green pastures, but if the only pasture available has more brown than green, they’ll get used to it. Why? Because it is BEYOND their ability to rise up and force their owners to move them to greener pastures.  After all they are sheep not lions.

Here is a story of sheep adjusting to browner pastures, with a positive spin.  What is aggravating to me is it reminds me of a story told to me back in the eighties by a woman who visited Europe for the first time. She marveled at the idea that families often stayed in the same house.  The older generation would be allowed to move to a new wing of the house as the new generation married and brought in a new family.  In one example the grandparents, parents and kids all lived together.  She thought it quaint.  I thought it an example of socialism taking out the heart of human’s desire to be free. The kids aren’t in the house because they want to be, they are there because they have no choice economically.

Just when you think the media can’t go any further into the tank for President Obama, AOL runs a piece celebrating the death of family income by touting “multigenerational homes.” Seriously. In a piece titled, “Multigenerational Homes: Real Estate’s Next Big Thing as More Families Share a Space,” Krisanne Alcantara gushes:

Being roommates with your parents after age 21 sounds like a nightmare for most, but Jessica Bruno wouldn’t have it any other way. Bruno, a 40-year-old mom, wife and DIY blogger, lives with her 62-year-old parents, Connie and Fred, in their Sutton, Mass., home.

Oh, and there’s Bruno’s husband, Tony, and their 6-year-old son, Tony Jr.

Think that’s a lot of people under one roof? There’s more. Bruno’s grandparents, Grace, 80, and Fred, 82, live in the house, too. That’s seven people from four generations living together in one home. Actually, make that nine: Bruno’s two stepdaughters, 12-year-old twins Alexia and Gabriella — Tony’s kids from another marriage — stay with them on weekends.

What fun! What’s the point of owning your own house if you can sponge off the parents for the next few decades? The Census Bureau has found that since 2000, multigenerational households are up 30 percent. That increase has largely been concentrated in the years since the recession.

But celebrate good times! There ain’t no party like a grandparents party, because a grandparents-parents-children party don’t stop. At least not under Obama.

The author of the piece agrees with me. There is NOTHING good here.  Inside the event is the tragedy that is facing us today, written in code, behind the fake smiles and “oh well” attitudes.   The truth is the natural order of things is that human nature demands, just like in the animal world, each successive generation find its own path. The desire to strike out on your own drives settlement, it drives innovation, it drives the economy (Where do construction workers get jobs if there are no new apartments or housing to be built? Where to retailers build new stores if there are no new customers in new cities?)

Here is a piece from the AOL story:

Being roommates with your parents after age 21 sounds like a nightmare for most, but Jessica Bruno wouldn’t have it any other way. Bruno, a 40-year-old mom, wife and DIY blogger, lives with her 62-year-old parents, Connie and Fred, in their Sutton, Mass., home.

Oh, and there’s Bruno’s husband, Tony, and their 6-year-old son, Tony Jr.

Think that’s a lot of people under one roof? There’s more. Bruno’s grandparents, Grace, 80, and Fred, 82, live in the house, too. That’s seven people from four generations living together in one home. Actually, make that nine: Bruno’s two stepdaughters, 12-year-old twins Alexia and Gabriella — Tony’s kids from another marriage — stay with them on weekends.

It might sound like a crowded living situation, but it’s not uncommon. The Bruno family is one of 4.4 million American households who have three generations or more living under one roof. There are also an estimated 51.4 million Americans that currently live in homes with more than two generations. According to the U.S. Census Bureau, multigenerational households are a growing trend, up 30 percent between 2000 and 2010, a figure that will only continue to grow, experts say.

“We’ve seen a 25 percent increase in demand for multigenerational housing structures over the past two years and expect to see more,” said Luis Tusino, CEO of the GBI-Avis building group, which specializes in building custom modular homes.

All of this reminds me of Obama’s speech where he describes the “new America.”  What he was referring to is our new reality where you cannot afford to move away, where families constrict their lifestyles in order to survive.  No new car sales, but greater repair jobs.  No new clothes, but wearing the old stuff a couple of more years.  We are a consumer society. We want to be able to move products (including housing and vehicles) in and out of our lives frequently.  The Iphone is an example, one of the few out there that still reflects this drive to upgrade.  I’ve seen people flip out from one perfectly functioning, all tricked out, Iphone to the new model for hundreds of dollars of new cost because the new model has one or two  more bells and whistles.  But those people can afford it.  Many in Obama’s “new America” cannot.

When Romney lost, we lost a good deal more than an election.  We lost a leader who “gets” what drives America.  Obama doesn’t. He is so filled with frustration and revenge and disdain for America he can’t really embrace the good that came out of our desire to conquer.  Not conquering other nations, but ourselves, our own limitations.   Our West was settled by people who didn’t listen to the meek- those people who didn’t want to risk leaving home.  The first routes to the Pacific were scouted by men who had little more than a horse, a mule, flint for fires and a rifle.  You can’t be out on your own more than that! Our dreams of reaching the moon weren’t dreamt by those content to live in mom’s basement.  It isn’t our way of life.

My Mensa bright buddy told me stories of spending some of his college years living in campsites.  He wasn’t rich by any means, but wanted to experience life outside his father’s rust-belt limited and very cold Ohio, so he found a way.  He went to work as a lifeguard in a southern state, lived in some very cheap campgrounds, went to school on a shoestring finally graduating from a Florida university. However, the key was every move he made outside his home was one to improve his life, which meant he was able to do more, buy more, produce more.  He refused to be a sheep.

People like that are examples of the true American spirit, and hated by Obama and resented by Obama’s jealous supporters.  A classic example of this was Hurricane Sandy and the pre-event tweets from…well people who would look like Obama’s son- at  least according to him.

In those tweets the overriding theme was they couldn’t wait to loot in order to “get theirs.”  What does that mean exactly? It means they don’t have something they think they deserve and rather than doing something American, like getting a job and paying for it, they are excited about taking it from someone impacted by a hurricane.  This is because whatever that other person thought in their minds was their own hard earned property was in fact, in the minds of the tweeters, owned by the looters. An “I deserve it” mentality. In police work, I actually talked to a thief who explained that very mindset to me.  I will quote him.

“If you are not strong enough to hold onto your property, then it isn’t yours.  It is mine. You are just holding onto to it for me until I come along.”

You REALLY need to pay attention to that.  It isn’t a fluke. Obama’s election, both of them, brought out these people from the darkness. They exist and exist  in great numbers. The second election, I think, knocked away some of the glitter from the first one and revealed just how many and how influential they are.

And they are very content to see you be forced to stay home, to live a limited life, to be forced to chose between necessities rather than splurge.  It is their life and they are miserable, and as all of us know- misery loves company.

Welcome to Obama’s America.

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